Monthly Archives: April 2015

Where the Winds Blow — Part 13

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Cereal Authors

by Ruth Davis Hays  2011

Literally ripped from each other’s arms, Lauralei and ‘Khiall face the fact that their love affair is no longer their little secret….

Lauralei clutched the bed sheets to shield herself. Continuing to scream, her startled terror changed to pleadings for mercy as she watched Solomen and her brothers descend upon the fallen fae boy.

Fury in his eyes, Solomen struck ‘Khiall with vicious blows from his walking staff while the twins kicked, stomped, and jeered at their stepbrother. Lauralei could hear wailing cries from both Sarrah and Ammarron coming from the hall, attempting to deflect her father’s wrath as it rained down on the immoral offender.

‘Khiall, vulnerable to the savagery of his adopted family, curled into a tight ball. The scarred twin landed several kicks with gleeful spite as the fae was caught up by one leg. “We caught you!” Galian shouted triumphantly, sinking his…

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To Submit or Not to Submit: 5 Arguments for Entering Writing Contests

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Kobo Writing Life

By Shayna Krishnasamy

When I was a young creative writing student I used to keep track of all the writing contests. I’d bookmark the contest pages on the websites of all the literary magazines. I’d make lists of due dates, word count limitations, themes, restrictions. Sometimes I’d even print out the submission forms. But did I ever actually send in a submission? Well…

If you’re a new writer, a writing student, or just nervous about sharing your work for the first time, submitting your story or novel to a writing contest can be incredibly daunting. You might find yourself coming up with any excuse to avoid actually submitting your work. You’ll convince yourself that your story isn’t polished enough, your first chapter doesn’t have enough of a hook, you don’t know how to write a synopsis, your plot is too racy, too boring, too cliched, too embarrassing. If you work…

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The Persecution of Mildred Dunlap by Paulette Mahurin

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Excellent review! I hope you don’t mind me sharing on my review site. Dellani

Ms M's Bookshelf

PersecutionOfMildredDunlapThe Persecution of Mildred Dunlap is set in a small town in Nevada called Red River Pass in the year 1895. The story begins the day a telegram arrives with the news that author Oscar Wilde has been sentenced to two years hard labour by a British court of law under the recently passed gross indecency law making it illegal for men to have sex with men. When the news arrives in Red River Pass, it sets into motion a series of events of racism, hatred, religious discrimination, vicious rumour, jealousy, and, finally, subtle, satisfying revenge.  It reminded me a bit of Little House on the Prairie where Nellie and her mother were always stirring things up and starting rumours, except that here it’s carried to extremes.  As in any community, there are people who bully others and indulge in malicious gossip and those who refuse to stand up to them…

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Sexy Middle Ages

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Sexy Middle Ages

Lady Smut

medievalsexby C. Margery Kempe

People believe just about any kind of foolishness about the Middle Ages, probably because of cartoons or bad teacher or I don’t know what. The truth is we still use a lot of wisdom from that time. The most outrageous idea is that people were prudish in medieval times.

Pardon me while I guffaw!

The thing I hear from my students is “the church controlled everything back then”; guffaws are now eclipsed by my stunned look of disbelief and rolling eyes. Yeah, at a time when most people went to church once a year, somehow that institution ‘controlled’ them. Yes, there are manuals the church made for quizzing people at that annual confession. Bet that was really effective, eh? What the monks wrote up didn’t necessarily have any bearing on what really happened. And monks were no puritans either: why do you think they were…

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